Enduring Power finds New Home this Month at San Francisco State Universityposted on 19 Sep 2015 | post

Enduring Power: The Middle Eastern and Iranian Woman’s Story will call San Francisco State University home later this month. Curated by Sina Araghi, a Los-Angeles based photographer, and produced by Tata Monfared, Senses Cultural’s founder, this traveling exhibition will be on display at the Cesar Chavez Student Art Center Gallery with the help of the Associated Students’ Art Gallery. With an opening reception of Sept 24th, this event will feature keynote speaker Karen AbuZayd, a former UN Diplomat who has devoted her career and life to countless humanitarian causes. This installation of this exhibit is also dedicated to Ms. AbuZayd, as she is an inspiration and strong role model to women wanting to make a positive change in the world.

Featuring photography that shares the lives of women from 7 different countries, these 44 images represent a wide range of experiences, aspirations, fears and realities of Middle Eastern and Iranian women. A collection of work by Razan Alzayani, Laura Boushnak, Boushra Almutawakel, Hagar Sobeea, Hamideh Zolfaghari, Sara Sasanee, Maryam Saeedpoor, and Mojgan Parsamgham, this exhibition shows an intimate and unique perspective of an otherwise private world to the American audience.

First displayed last year at UC Davis, Enduring Power: The Middle Eastern and Iranian Woman’s Story was met with great support and interest by the Davis community. Students, teachers and parents alike noted that this exhibition gave the viewer a stronger understanding of life for women and children in different parts of the world, as well as brought light to the similarities that women everywhere share.

Senses Cultural strives to create understanding through artistic experiences. With better understanding across cultures, Senses believes that we can create positive change and a more peaceful world. With the help of San Francisco State University, Senses Cultural looks forward to sharing Enduring Power with a larger audience while continuing to tell the private and public stories that accompany the photos in the show.

by Silvana Gargione